Syscon Error Codes

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Contents

Description[edit]

Syscon memory contains a table of size 0x100 bytes intended to store error codes, every error code is composed by 4 bytes + another 4 bytes for its timestamp, in total the table can store 32 errors. When the table is full of errors and a new error needs to be stored syscon deletes the oldest

How to get the syscon error log[edit]

If the PS3 still boots up to the XMB and is able to install and run apps you can use programs like the ones mentioned at top of Platform ID page
If the PS3 doesnt boots is still posible to retrieve the syscon error log by connecting a PC to syscon UART port using a "USB to TTL UART adapter" and running the command errlog. There is also the command clearerrlog to empty the error table (handy to prevent confusions with old error codes that could be cummulated along the months/years and not related with the actual problem)

Error log format[edit]

There are 2 error log formats that depends of the syscon type: for Mullion, or for Sherwood
The error codes and the timestamps are stored in little endian (right to left)
The timestamps are in J2000 format (number of elapsed seconds since 2000/1/1 12:00:00). It can be converted as an standared unix epoch and then summed 30 years - 12 hours (or 946684800 seconds). See 1
If the battery was empty or removed when the error was triggered the timestamp is recorded as FFFFFFFF
If the battery is replaced but the time is not configured under GameOS (either manualy or by network) it seems the errorlog stores timestamps starting with a date around 2005/12/31 00:00:00 (0x0B488680)
More info about errorlog timestamp formats and loops in the Talk page


Syscon Errorlog from CECHAxx, COK-001, CXR713120-201GB
Offset(h) 00 01 02 03  04 05 06 07  08 09 0A 0B  0C 0D 0E 0F
                                                 
00003700  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0
00003710  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  04 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0
00003720  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0
00003730  01 10 80 A0  04 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0
00003740  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0
00003750  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  04 30 09 A0  04 30 09 A0
00003760  04 30 09 A0  04 30 09 A0  FF FF FF FF  01 10 80 A0
00003770  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0  01 10 80 A0
                                                 
00003780  20 CF 6D 16  13 23 A7 16  3E D6 D9 16  87 13 2A 17
00003790  17 3C 7C 17  E4 A2 A3 17  A2 15 D4 17  13 FB EB 17
000037A0  CD 7D EF 17  33 85 EF 17  12 8C EF 17  A7 D9 FB 17
000037B0  58 5E 0E 18  BB C9 66 18  CD 25 B5 18  49 C4 29 19
000037C0  75 D5 F9 19  04 8B 61 1B  17 67 D0 22  2D 67 D0 22
000037D0  03 07 6C 27  12 09 6C 27  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000037E0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  F0 E7 27 16  06 BD 33 16
000037F0  E5 DE 38 16  DD D4 5C 16  C4 AC 6C 16  EA C7 6D 16
  • In the errorlog sample above:
    • Errorlog looped at least 1 time (1 errorcode FFFFFFFF)
    • Timestamps are valid, and the time was configured
    • Contains errors: A080 1  001 , A080 1  004 , A009 3  004 
Syscon Errorlog from CECHHxx, DIA-001, CXR714120-301GB
Offset(h) 00 01 02 03  04 05 06 07  08 09 0A 0B  0C 0D 0E 0F
                                                 
00003700  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0
00003710  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  FF FF FF FF  34 30 40 A0
00003720  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0
00003730  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0
00003740  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0
00003750  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0
00003760  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0
00003770  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0  22 43 40 A0  34 30 40 A0
                                                 
00003780  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
00003790  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000037A0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000037B0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000037C0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000037D0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000037E0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000037F0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
  • In the errorlog sample above:
    • Errorlog looped at least 1 time (1 errorcode FFFFFFFF)
    • Timestamps are invalid
    • Contains errors: A040 4  322 , A040 3  034 
Syscon Errorlog from CECHLxx/Mxx/Pxx/Qxx, VER-001, SW-301
Offset(h) 00 01 02 03  04 05 06 07  08 09 0A 0B  0C 0D 0E 0F
                                                 
00000900  31 21 80 A0  73 D4 50 0B  30 20 40 A0  89 D4 50 0B
00000910  31 21 80 A0  8C D4 50 0B  30 20 80 A0  8E D4 50 0B
00000920  30 21 80 A0  8E D4 50 0B  31 21 80 A0  8F D4 50 0B
00000930  01 30 00 A0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
00000940  30 20 80 A0  75 D1 50 0B  30 20 80 A0  78 D1 50 0B
00000950  30 20 80 A0  B2 D1 50 0B  31 20 80 A0  B3 D1 50 0B
00000960  30 21 80 A0  BD D1 50 0B  30 21 80 A0  D5 D1 50 0B
00000970  30 21 80 A0  DF D1 50 0B  30 20 80 A0  E0 D1 50 0B
00000980  31 21 80 A0  84 D2 50 0B  30 21 80 A0  DC D2 50 0B
00000990  31 21 32 A0  4F D3 50 0B  31 20 40 A0  50 D3 50 0B
000009A0  31 21 80 A0  51 D3 50 0B  30 21 80 A0  57 D3 50 0B
000009B0  31 21 80 A0  59 D3 50 0B  31 21 80 A0  FF D3 50 0B
000009C0  31 21 80 A0  05 D4 50 0B  30 20 80 A0  06 D4 50 0B
000009D0  30 20 80 A0  07 D4 50 0B  31 21 80 A0  2D D4 50 0B
000009E0  31 20 80 A0  3A D4 50 0B  30 21 80 A0  42 D4 50 0B
000009F0  30 21 80 A0  72 D4 50 0B  31 21 80 A0  72 D4 50 0B
  • In the errorlog sample above:
    • Errorlog looped at least 1 time (1 errorcode FFFFFFFF)
    • Timestamps are valid, but the time was not configured
    • Contains errors: A080 2  131 , A040 2  030 , A080 2  030 
      A080 2  130 , A000 3  001 , A080 2  031 
      A032 2  131 , A040 2  031 
Syscon Errorlog from CECH-42xx, PQX-001, SW3-304
Offset(h) 00 01 02 03  04 05 06 07  08 09 0A 0B  0C 0D 0E 0F
                                                 
00000900  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000910  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000920  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000930  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000940  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000950  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000960  02 18 61 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 40 40 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000970  34 30 40 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 40 40 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000980  34 30 40 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 40 40 A0  FF FF FF FF
00000990  34 30 40 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 40 40 A0  FF FF FF FF
000009A0  34 30 40 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 40 40 A0  FF FF FF FF
000009B0  34 30 40 A0  FF FF FF FF  02 40 40 A0  FF FF FF FF
000009C0  34 30 40 A0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000009D0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000009E0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
000009F0  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF  FF FF FF FF
  • In the errorlog sample above:
    • Errorlog not looped (more than 1 errorcode FFFFFFFF)
    • Timestamps are invalid
    • Contains errors: A061 1  802 , A040 4  002 , A040 3  034 

Error code format[edit]

The error codes follows the format:  A  R  ST  C  ERR , where:

  •  A  (Fixed)
    • A = This is always "A"
  •  R  (Reserved)
    • 0-E = Unknown
    • F = Frequent error (For example, Motherboard Damage/Breakdown, etc.)
  •  ST  (Step Number)
    • 00-7F = Step Number of the Power On Sequence (POS). This is the Power On Self Test (POST) process. If successful, the BOOT process begins, which loads the OS.
    • 80 = Static State (Power ON). The console completed the POST and was in a static state. The error happened when the PS3 was powered on. You can get an error with Step No. 80 if your error occurs in game. For example, 80 1002 errors can happen if your NEC/TOKINs are going bad.
    • 90 = Static State (Power OFF). The error happened when the PS3 was powering off. For example, if a problem causes the system to hang while shutting down the console will beep before powering off. An error with step no. 90 will be recorded in the errorlog.
    • A0 = Immediately after SYSCON reset. A reset pulse is sent to the console's main chipset to coordinate and synchronize them. If an error occurs immediately after SYSCON reset, it means it occurred before anything else can happen. For example, if the CPU is completely dead it will not respond to the reset pulse and an error will be generated immediately after reset.
  •  C  (Category)
    • 1 = System Error
    • 2 = Fatal Error
    • 3 = Boot Error
    • 4 = Data Error
  •  ERR  (Error)
    • Any number in hex

Examples:
A0801002

  • System Error 002 (RSX VRAM Power Fail) which occurred while the System was successfully powered On.
  • 1002 errors are known to be caused by bad NEC/TOKINs, but may not be the only cause. See Error Code section below for more details.

A0403034

  • Fatal Booting Error 034 (RSX/CELL Communication Error) which occurred at step no. 40, before the Power On Sequence completed.
  • 3034 errors are known to be caused by BGA Defects (among other issues). See Error Code section below for more details.

While the Reserved Area and Step Number can be useful to figure out when the error occurred and how frequent it is, the last four numbers are the most important for figuring out what the error means. So the following Error Code section will only list the last 4 numbers (category + error).

Error codes[edit]

System Errors[edit]


1001 (Power CELL)[edit]

  • Components Involved:
    • CELL (IC1001 on COK-001)
    • NEC/TOKIN Proadlizers (C6140/C6141/C6142/C6143 on COK-001)
    • Other nearby components of the power block

Speculation:
1001 errors happen when the system encounters an unexpected shutdown. They often occur in testing, when the console is turned on/off a lot, instead of graceful shutdown. They have been associated with other errors, but there doesn't appear to be any single cause.

The hypothesis that this error is associated with insufficient Filtering on CPU's core voltage (VDDC) has not been confirmed. There is a range of voltage ripple/noise that "should" cause errors before it gets so bad it causes a CELL VDDC Power Failure (3003). There are numerous SMD components involved in filtering, but the main concern are the NEC/TOKIN Proadlizers (capacitors). 1002 errors are the fingerprint of bad tokins on the GPU, but 1001 has not been shown to have the same association with the CPU's filter. However, a connection is strongly suspected.

1002 (Power RSX)[edit]

  • Components Involved:
    • RSX (IC2001 on COK-001)
    • NEC/TOKIN Proadlizers (C6229/C6230/C6231/C6232 on COK-001)
    • Other nearby components of the power block

This error has been associated with insufficient Filtering on RSX_VDDC power line. There is a range of voltage ripple/noise that will cause this error before it gets so bad it causes an RSX_VDDC Power Failure (3004). YLOD's causing 1002's range in duration from 2 seconds to only occurring during intense games.

There are numerous SMD components involved in filtering, but the main concern are the NEC/TOKIN Proadlizers (capacitors). 1002 errors are the fingerprint of bad tokins.

1004 (Power AC/DC)[edit]

1103 (Thermal)[edit]

1200 (Thermal CELL)[edit]

  • Components Involved:

CPU Overheat. This is a common error. The usual culprit is failed Thermal Interface Material (TIM). As the material ages it "dries" allowing air inside. Air is a heat insulator, reducing the TIM's ability to transfer enough heat away from the processor. The system fan will steadily get louder over time until it cannot keep up. Once the processor approaches it's Thermal Shutdown Temperature a Yellow LED begins flashing on the console (Early Phat Models). Once it reaches the Thermal Shutdown Temperature the console will beep three times and hard shutdown, flashing red until the console is unplugged and the error state reset. Error 1200 is generated in the SYSCON errorlog.

First be sure the system fan is working. If so, apply new TIM Between the Internal Heat Spreader (IHS) and Heatsink (HS). If that does not resolve the problem, carefully remove the IHS (Delid) and replace the TIM between the IHS and processor DIE.

If that still doesn't work, it could be an issue with the temperature monitor chip (IC1101). Beyond that, some users have noted that dead CPU's can throw error 1200. However, that's the limit of our current understanding. It could be dead, or have another unexplained issue, but usually reflowing or reballing is the last ditch effort to revive such a console.

1201 (Thermal RSX)[edit]

  • Components Involved:

GPU Overheat. This is the same as error 1200 above, except it's for the GPU. The same repair steps apply, except it's Temperature Monitor Chip is IC2101.

1203 (Thermal CELL VR)[edit]

Some PS3 motherboards (TMU-520, COK-001, COK-002), have a temperature monitor located somewhere in the CELL power block. The other retail PS3 motherboard models doesnt meassures the temperature of the CELL VR

All the PS3 temperature monitor chips have a internal thermal sensor integrated + 2 pins for an optional external sensor. The temperature monitors for CELL and RSX are configured to use the external sensor, but this one for CELL VR probably uses the internal

1204 (Thermal South Bridge)[edit]

1205 (Thermal EE/GS)[edit]

This error is specific for COK-001/CXD2953AGB (with full PS2 hardware compatibility, EE+GS) or COK-002/CXD2972GB (with partial PS2 hardware compatibility, GS only)

1301[edit]

CELL PLL

14FF[edit]

Check stop

1601[edit]

BE Livelock Detection

Speculation: If a YLOD turns into a GLOD after reball/reflow then 1601 (with or without 1701) could mean the RSX RAM was damaged. This is a loose association based on a few user reports.

1701[edit]

CELL attention

A user get this error code with a damaged hard drive. He was transfering some games via FTP, and his console turned off with Ylod. When he tried to turn on again, he get a Glod. Problem was fixed just changing the HDD.

1802[edit]

RSX init

1900 (RTC Voltage)[edit]

RTC voltage

1901 (RTC Oscilator)[edit]

RTC oscilator

1902 (RTC Access)[edit]

RTC access


Fatal Errors[edit]


  • This error codes seems to be repeated up to 3 times for 3 special cases, as example, errors 2003, 2103, 2203 are related to southbridge, the only thing that changes in the error code is the second digit (located inmediatly after the category). If at some point we find what means that digit we can join the wiki page sections together (with titles: "2001 & 2101", "2002 & 2102", "2003 & 2103", etc...)

2001 (CELL)[edit]

CELL (IC1001)

2002 (RSX)[edit]

RSX (IC2001)

2003 (South Bridge)[edit]

South Bridge Error (IC3001)

2010 (Clock Subsystems)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5001)

2011 (Clock CELL)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5003)

2012 (Clock CELL)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5002)

2013 (Clock CELL, RSX, South Bridge)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5004)

2020 (HDMI)[edit]

HDMI Error (IC2502)

2022 (DVE)[edit]

DVE Error (IC2406, CXM4024R MultiAV controller for analog out)

2024 (AV)[edit]

This error tends to cause a delayed Yellow Light Of Death (10s - 1min). Sometimes described as a Green Light Of Death (GLOD) or Red Light Of Death (RLOD).

2124 and 2024 errors have been fixed by replacing both the AV and HDMI encoders. One user reported 2024/2124 errors resolved by replacing the HDMI encoder. Another removed the HDMI encoder and tested the console without it. That console primarily filled the errorlog with 2124 errors, but a few 2024's as well. So it is unclear if 2124 is specific to the HDMI Encoder or AV Encoder. It seems it could be either.

2030 (Thermal Sensor, CELL)[edit]

Speculation: 2030-33 errors reported in case of dodgy PWR/EJT daughter board.

2031 (Thermal Sensor, RSX)[edit]

2033 (Thermal Sensor, South Bridge)[edit]

2101 (CELL)[edit]

CELL (IC1001)

2102 (RSX)[edit]

RSX (IC2001)

2103 (South Bridge)[edit]

Southbridge Error (IC3001)

2110 (Clock Subsystems)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5001)

This error can be caused by a 5V_MISC short to ground. One user had an A0022110 after replacing IC6105 (Buck Converter) and accidentally bridging the 5V voltage input. So check the 5V line for shorts.

This error has been resolved by a number of users who had a short on F6001. It is important to note that something usually causes that fuse to blow, like a short. So it's important to troubleshoot the board to find and repair the shorting component before replacing the fuse. Otherwise the new one will blow too.

One user, who resolved this error on his C model PS3, noted "very short YLOD. Error code shows 2110[...]Some earlier code shows 1001 and 1002." The 1001 & 1002 errors he noted in the log before the 2110 appeared may have been a clue that C6019 was deteriorating. Further investigation is needed to confirm this hypothesis, however. In his case, C6019 was shorting and caused F6001 to blow. This short overloaded F6001 and cut power to many Subsystems, such as the HDD, USB ports, South bridge, CPU, GPU, etc.

One particularly noteworthy component is IC6020, which supplys +3.3v_MK_Vdd to the clock generator (IC5001). When F6001 blows, a 02 2110 is generated. A step number of 02 is very early in the power on sequence (POS), which explains why 2110 is triggered instead of another error code. Since the clock generator is critical for timing, it is one of the first things the SYSCON checks during the POS.

2111 (Clock CELL)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5003)

2112 (Clock CELL)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5002)

2113 (Clock CELL, RSX, South Bridge)[edit]

Clock Generator Error (IC5004)

2120 (HDMI)[edit]

HDMI Error (IC2502)

A0202120/A0213013 error combinations are common. They appear to be related to VDDIO. IC6301 is involved in the formation of +1.7V_MISC, which amonge other things provides input power to the DC-DC converters that output +1.2V_YC_RC_VDDIO, +1.5V_YC_RC_VDDA, +1.2V_SB_VDDC and +1.2V_SB_VDDR. Lack of voltage to these DC/DC converters downstream of IC6301 suggests F6302 has blown. A number of people have fixed these 2120/3013 errors by finding shorts at or near C6320 and replacing Fuse F6302. But there are many other SMD nearby that might cause these fuses to blow. So you will need to track the source of the short and fix it, or the fuse will just blow again.

A bad thermistor (TH2501) has been reported to cause A0002120.

A0802120 and A0902120 errors may be related to the actual HDMI transmitter (IC2502). Or they can be caused by BGA/Bump defects affecting VDDIO, on the RSX or CELL. BGA defects on the RSX VDDIO pads have been confirmed with a pressure test to have caused 2120 errors.

2122 (DVE)[edit]

DVE Error (IC2406, CXM4024R MultiAV controller for analog out)

2124 (AV)[edit]

This error tends to cause a delayed Yellow Light Of Death (10s - 1min). Sometimes described as a Green Light Of Death (GLOD) or Red Light Of Death (RLOD).

2124 and 2024 errors have been fixed by replacing both the AV and HDMI encoders. One user reported 2024/2124 errors resolved by replacing the HDMI encoder. Another removed the HDMI encoder and tested the console without it. That console primarily filled the errorlog with 2124 errors, but a few 2024's as well. So it is unclear if 2124 is specific to the HDMI Encoder or AV Encoder. It seems it could be either.

2130 (Thermal Sensor, CELL)[edit]

2131 (Thermal Sensor, RSX)[edit]

2133 (Thermal Sensor, South Bridge)[edit]

2203 (South Bridge)[edit]

South Bridge Error (IC3001)


Fatal Boot Errors[edit]


3000[edit]

Power Failure

3001[edit]

12v Power Failure

Usually this caused by a bad Power Supply Unit (PSU).

Alternatively, a failure on the 12v_main line can cause it. Check fuses, capacitors, resistors, and IC's on the 12v line. Measure resistance of the large 2 prong 12v connector on the motherboard. It should read in the Kilo ohms range if there is sufficient separation. Otherwise you may have a short somewhere on the line.

3002[edit]

Power Failure

3003[edit]

VDDC CELL Power Failure

This error will occur in the case of a PWR failure on the main core voltage of the CPU. For example, if the filtering capacitors (NEC/TOKIN's) are severely damaged. There are other SMD's in that filter, so it could be related to them as well.

3004[edit]

VDDC RSX Power Failure

This error will occur in the case of a PWR failure on the main core voltage of the GPU. For example, if the filtering capacitors (NEC/TOKIN's) are severely damaged. There are other SMD's in that filter, so it could be related to them as well.

3010[edit]

CELL Error

Observation: A user triggered this error by injecting 3.3V into PWRGD (power good) of IC6103 (NCP5318 CPU Buck Controller). It generated error 20 1001 and 20 3010.

3011[edit]

CELL

3012[edit]

CELL

3013[edit]

BE_SPI DI/DO ERROR

CELL not communicating to syscon via SPI (1.2V MC2_VDDIO and 1.2V BE_VCS no output) = Possible shorts on the line, check C4001 and trailing caps. Possible dead CPU?

Another user had one on a CPU he damaged while deliding.

A0212120/A0213013 error combinations are common. They appear to be related to VDDIO. IC6301 is involved in the formation of +1.7V_MISC, which among other things provides input power to the DC-DC converters that output +1.2V_YC_RC_VDDIO, +1.5V_YC_RC_VDDA, +1.2V_SB_VDDC and +1.2V_SB_VDDR. Lack of voltage to these DC/DC converters downstream of IC6301 suggests F6302 has blown. A number of people have fixed these 2120/3013 errors by finding shorts at or near C6320 and replacing Fuse F6302. But there are many other SMD nearby that might cause these fuses to blow. So you will need to track the source of the short and fix it, or the fuse will just blow again.

One person reported A0202120/A0213013 when his CPU substrate (interposer) was cracked in half by a failed delid attempt.

3020[edit]

CELL

3030[edit]

CELL

3031[edit]

CELL

3032[edit]

CELL Error

+1.2v_YC_RC_VDDIO PWR Fail?

3033[edit]

CELL

3034[edit]

CELL / RSX Communication Error

This is the most common error seen in early Phat model PS3's with the hottest 90nm RSX and CELL processors. It is the hallmark of a BGA defect (such as a cracked solder ball). It is by no means limited to the early models, however. These arrors have been seen in every model of PS3 with varying frequency. The most reliable consoles appear to be those with a CPU/GPU of smaller manufacturing process, such as the Super Slim (SS) models (42xx and later) which have a 45nm CELL and 28nm RSX. The least reliable are the PS2 Backwards Compatable A-E Models, which have 90nm RSX/CELL.

The root cause is mechanical fatigue due to thermal cycling. The materials used to contruct the motherboard and processors have different properties. For example, the cooefficient of thermal expansion for FR4 Fiberglass used in the Motherboard and Processor Substrate is different than that of the copper BGA pads, which is different than that of the Lead-Free solder used to join them. This means they will expand and contract at different rates as the chip heats up and cools down, which applies shearing force to the BGA. Over many thermal cycle this deforms the solder balls and cause a defect (Such as a solder crack, torn trace, or the ball may pull away from the pad).

3034 is triggered when the voltage or data lines connecting the CPU/GPU are broken. There is often a data error (4XXX) that also appears, but not always. The most common cause is a BGA defect on the RSX, which usually requires a reball/reflow to repair. Something about the RSX construction or workload causes it to fail more frequently, but the CPU can fail too. However, it's not always a BGA defect. The bumps on either chip can fail, Flex IO traces (the data lines that connect the CPU/GPU) can be broken/scratched, or accumulated damage from wear and tear (electromigration) can also cause this error. The true percentage of consoles with BGA defects that can be fixed with a reball/reflow is unknown. However, there is evidence to suggest that the underfill used to reinforce the CPU/GPU die and RSX Ram bumps was not as effective when the PS3 was manufactured. This could explain many of the consoles who's reball fails prematurely afterwards.

If a reflow/reball of both the CPU/GPU fails, then the chip is beyond repair and needs replaced. The RSX can be replaced with the same model without modification. It can be replaced with a different model using a modchip that injects the correct RSX ID during boot. This has been nicknamed a "Frankenstein Mod." Since they are married to each other, the CPU can only be replaced if also replacing the chipset (NAND/NOR and SYSCON Chips). Since the CPU can't as easily be replaced, a dead CPU is usually considered unrepairable.

3035[edit]

CELL and RSX

3036[edit]

CELL and RSX

3037[edit]

CELL and RSX

3038[edit]

CELL and RSX

3039[edit]

CELL and RSX

3040[edit]

Flash


Data Errors[edit]


  • This error codes seems to be repeated up to 5 times for 5 special cases, as example, errors 4001, 4101, 4201, 4301, 4401 are related to CELL, the only thing that changes in the error code is the second digit (located inmediatly after the category). If at some point we find what means that digit we can join the wiki page sections together (with titles: "4001, 4101, 4201, 4301, 4401", etc...)

4001[edit]

CELL

4002[edit]

RSX

4003[edit]

Southbridge

4011[edit]

CELL

4101[edit]

CELL

4102[edit]

RSX

4103[edit]

Southbridge

4111[edit]

CELL

4201[edit]

CELL

4202[edit]

RSX

4203[edit]

Southbridge

4211[edit]

CELL

4212[edit]

RSX

4221[edit]

CELL

4222[edit]

RSX

4231[edit]

CELL

4261[edit]

CELL

4301[edit]

CELL

4302[edit]

RSX

4303[edit]

Southbridge

4311[edit]

CELL

4312[edit]

RSX

4321[edit]

CELL

4322[edit]

RSX

4332[edit]

RSX

4341[edit]

CELL

4401[edit]

CELL or RSX

4402[edit]

CELL or RSX

4403[edit]

CELL or RSX

4411[edit]

CELL or RSX

4412[edit]

CELL or RSX

4421[edit]

CELL or RSX

4422[edit]

CELL or RSX

4432[edit]

CELL or RSX

4441[edit]

CELL or RSX